continent. maps a topology of unstable confluences and ranges across new thinking, traversing interstices and alternate directions in culture, theory, biopolitics and art.
Issue 2.4 / 2012
Letter from the Editors
Jamie Allen, Paul Boshears, Nico Jenkins
With grateful hearts we offer this, the fourth issue of our second volume. The result of months of back-breaking thinking, emailing, looking, clicking, watching, writing and reading, our winter issue is here. The editors could not have done this without your support. We welcome your materials for our future issues as well as your continued contributions. Purchase your copy of our first book from Punctum Books.
Laruelle and Art
Alexander R. Galloway
“With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at?“ James Turrell once asked. Building with François Laruelle‘s recently published Photo-Fiction, a Non-Standard Aesthetics (Univocal) as well as a trove of untranslated essays, Galloway investigates the utopian thread that runs through non-standard aesthetics.
Aesthetics in the 21st Century: Walter Derungs & Oliver Minder
Peter Burleigh
Reporting from the University of Basel‘s Aesthetics in the 21st Century conference held in September, 2012. Can works of art be realized outside the human experience? Derungs and Minder attempt non-directional observation in their speculative exhibition.
Stage Notes and/as/or Track Changes: Introductory remarks and magical thinking on printing: An election and a provocation.
Isaac Linder
In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel "All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose," convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group.
A Continuous Act...
Nico Jenkins
Traditionally, a wayzgoose was a celebration at the end of a printer’s year, a night off in the late fall before the work began of printing by candlelight. According to the OED, the Master Printer would make for the journeymen “a good Feast, and not only entertains them at his own House, but besides, gives them Money to spend at the Ale-house or Tavern at Night.”
Fuck Peer Review
Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei
continent. proposes that the thinking of the Academy be freed to be thought elsewhere, in the alleys and doorways of the village and cities, encountered not in the strictly defined spaces of the classroom and blackboard (now white) but anticipated and found where thinking occurs.
What Are Experts For?
A. Staley Groves
All in a Jurnal’s Work will discuss (in part) the ramifications of cheap start-up publications that are challenging the traditional ensconced-in-ivory academic journals and their supporting infrastructures. The panel will be seeking a questioning (as a challenging) towards the discipline of knowledge production/fabrication (of truth[s]) and the event of the Academy (and its publications) as it has evolved and continues to (d)evolve.
Disturbing the Wednesday-ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest
Eileen A. Joy
Historically, academic journals have served a different purpose than the Academy itself. Journals (from the Anglo-Fr. jurnal, "a day," from O.Fr. jornel, "day, time; day's work," hence the journalist as writer of the news of the day) have served as privileged sites for the articulation and concretization of specific modes of knowledge and control (insemination of those ideas has been formalized in the classroom, in seminar).
Publish and Be Damned? continent. visits independent publishers fair
Bernhard Garnicnig
We had the honor of joining the Publish and Be Damned: Nordic Models Conference and Fair at the Index Foundation in Stockholm. We staged a ritualized photo session focused on our logo's red square and asked each of the twenty independent publishers present to pose for our imaginary red book. This let loose a global wave of editorial energy towards the first printed volume of continent., published with Punctum Books.
Kissing in the Shadow
Paul Thomas, Tim Morton
28 August, Newtown, Sydney: following an encounter the day prior at the National Institute for Experimental Arts, they meet again. A fluid discussion around art, perception, philosophy, vision, probabilities, and physics resulted—transforming into an activity of mobile phone photography—a photo-walk, a means of engaging with the world. The walk down King Street is a visual discussion, collected observations of things noted, a probability map, and a becoming, “like the emergence of another world.”