continent. maps a topology of unstable confluences and ranges across new thinking, traversing interstices and alternate directions in culture, theory, biopolitics and art.
Issue 7.1 / 2018: 37-60

Artist Chat

Franziska Huemer-Fistelberger
frantiseck@gmail.com
19:50:11 What's your favourite tool? Explain or illustrate why 
Rosemary Lee
20:03:45 Probably the most essential tool in my arsenal is the humble ball-point pen. Whatever I'm working on, I'm able to get my ideas out most easily using pen and paper to sketch, annotate or draft texts. I used to draw beautifully, but found my drawing skills have turned more to facilitating the flow of ideas onto the page. Now my drawings are often plans for things, referential instead of representational. They point to ideas and artworks rather than being themselves art.
zago.enrico@gmail.com
20:13:45 i use to sketch on paper some ideas before start sculpting, not always but often. those are more "mood" sketches, they're more expressive thant the object i going to model
20:15:10 nodes for creating the material, like how much glossiness i want, how much translucent, adding displacements, textures and so on
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45 usually im working on zbrush (for scupting objects) then im setting the environment and the light in blender and i adjust and add some elements in photoshop
zago.enrico@gmail.com
20:23:17 for the non virtual tools i have this trick: i have a wacom pen tablet from 2010 (im really attache to that),  i know that is not the best in terms of pressure and velocity, but some times i put a piece of paper between the tablet and the pen to have more grip 
zago.enrico@gmail.com
20:26:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
19:58:00 ah ok
19:58:38 that's the mesh structure of the object
19:59:06 all the faces of the polygon
20:02:16 usually i use the interface like that: top left is the node editor where i create materials, top right it's where i render a preview in real time, bottom left it's where setting the scene.
20:05:44 the orange thingy can be sculpted, modeled, rotate, moved, sized up and down...
20:06:39 but for that im using the other software (zbrush)
20:07:18 i sent the video via wetransfer
zago.enrico@gmail.com
20:26:45
Rosemary Lee
20:14:38 As a counter-point to the ball-point pen, my laptop is probably the tool I use most in my practice.
20:19:09 In comparison, the functions I use my computer for are accessing information or processing it, for example gathering images and texts during the research phase of a project or for editing images and text for the finished product.
20:21:53 That might be what makes pen and paper so conducive to the creative process, that it allows me to focus on externalising things rather than being enmeshed in the flux of information.
Rosemary Lee
20:26:45
Peter Moosgaard
12:26:07 i try to use less and less tools, but the more basic the better: like strings, hammer, knife, tape .. a virtual tool i often use is the browser. i like browser based art.   
12:27:56 .
Peter Moosgaard
13:24:41 one reason is to keep things simple. it just calms me down. it is interresting to see what your hands can do alone, also if you need to do something (as i said) you can use anything as a tool. for example you dont even necessarily need a hammer. you can use any solid, hard object the right size. so you have to remain creative in using and re-using things. in an occult tradition it is said that the more you process materials yourself, the more powerful the get. i guess things are more relatable, special to you if have made them yourfelf. so in using less tools, the relation to the work is more intimate. you feel closer.    
Peter Moosgaard
13:27:45
Rosemary Lee
20:35:15 Yes, I think the medium/tool enables different modalities of thinking/working.
20:36:31 But once I start physically building something, I also feel as though the limitations of certain media then influence the direction I take.
Rosemary Lee
20:38:45
Rosemary Lee
20:39:02
Rosemary Lee
20:40:17 That is something I end up working with quite a bit, trying to find the edges of different media and how they can be pushed to reveal their effects on thinking, acting, etc.
Peter Moosgaard
13:00:25 its funny because every tool we encounter during our day wants an exact behaviour, a very special move from you, formulating a sort of grammar throughout you daily routine. It is so obvious to us how we should use these tools, like a phone, a doorknob, stairs, a cup, a shirt, that we dont realise how these tools make our body perform a sort of "dance" everyday. imagine using everything a bit different, how your rituals would change, like reading your t-shirts, wearing your dishes, lifting your chairs etc ..
13:03:35 we assume we do these routines out of a free will, but dont the tools make us move a certain way. 
Peter Moosgaard
13:07:45
Rosemary Lee
20:49:09 I find I sometimes end up feeling constricted by my computer because of its multifunctionality. It can do so many things, but sometimes that is overwhelming and I end up actually only using a fraction of its potentiality, instead gravitating toward a few specific programs.
Joe Hamilton
10:50:07 I often find things when I'm trying to do something new and my current tools will not do the job. I also learn a lot working on commercial jobs. I do freelance animation and creative direction for a company that produces 3D visualisation for the architecture industry.
Joe Hamilton
10:19:50 Most of the time I start with items that I discover in common places like news articles or social media posts. These common images often trigger an idea which leads me to search for additional images in obscure archives.
10:22:39 I enjoy finding obscure archives.
10:28:09 I've become obsessed with technical drawings in SVG format lately. Building floor plans, product technical details etc. 
There are some interesting new tools to work with SVG images online so I might work with for a new online project in the future.
Joe Hamilton
10:32:45
Joe Hamilton
10:39:39 It's a technical drawing of a building product. I have a collection of hundreds of these in a similar style. They are very precise and a very flexible material in their vector format. 
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:50:28 i will say that im  interested on the scalability that objects can have in digital space, so i found architecture a field that is full of research for me.
zago.enrico@gmail.com
18:12:27 when i saw for the first time the work of Hernan DIaz Alonzo for example i was amazed by the sensuality of those fictionary buildings and at that time i was still working in 2d so i think that was a decisive encounter
Joe Hamilton
11:14:23 I'm working on a new series titled 'Field Signs' in which I'm trying to visualise power structures that cross traditional borders while also just playing with the visual identities of countries and corporations. I have big archives of flags and logos and I'm exploring ways of combining related flags/logos to speak about the complex relationships between these entities. With the technical drawings I'm interested to see if they could be repurposed to represent certain layers of technology/agreements/policies that allow these structures to form. The drawings would be composed in some way with the deconstructed and layered flag/logo imagery.
Joe Hamilton
11:20:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:37:05 sure is im not a physicist so im looking for interesting errors in the software
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:22:43 those are some experiments that i trashed im my "Lost" folder
17:23:53 basically they're born out of jam sessions of different softwares
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:28:12
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:28:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:30:12 one thing that take a lot of my attention is the materiality, i spend a lot of time researcing, play around and create new "virtual susbtances"
17:30:24 this for example
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:30:45
Peter Moosgaard
17:29:01 i pick things that are interesting, or desireable for many people (brands, luxury products, art masterpieces etc ..) so im researching a collective desire towards those objects. my opinion is irrelevant. this collective desire is in close relation with the concept of the "archtype".
17:29:10 archetype
Peter Moosgaard
17:35:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
18:17:12 my work is a constant play between shapes, materials and textures in order to disrupt their natural entanglements to establish new ones. i’m interested to investigate materiality from a perspective that allows to suspend all previous judgment and knowledge, for example using liquid’s “liquidness” as an instant quality dived into it’s here-and-now
18:19:08 applying this research for boundaries not yet defined I want to questioning the methods how we perceive physical and virtual materiality and emphasize the not-ownership of an object to it’s own qualities.
18:22:48 btw i hope in the future we'll have the technology to taste the digitality... looking forward to havea try of the internet
Peter Moosgaard
17:25:14 i imitate objects. i replicate them. you could say i have faith in the principle of "money see monkey do". i think people a copycats, to have another animal, only they cant admit it.  
Peter Moosgaard
17:27:45
Peter Moosgaard
14:21:46 in this case i gave hermit crabs tiny guggenheim museums. they used it as a shell.
frantiseck@gmail.com
19:50:11 What places/spaces form the setting of your (current) artistic activities?
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
15:40:07 here the city of Moscow is still stuck in autumn, but the programme is really great
zago.enrico@gmail.com
15:42:27 It's called The New Normal, hosted for the first time at Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design
zago.enrico@gmail.com
15:44:50 it's a 6 month postgraduate, in which we had some interesting field trip in the Arctic and California 
15:46:21 it's a postgraduate in ... i will say urbanistic
15:47:26 with a speculative approach to the matter (we are trying to define and visualize some society aspects in 2050 in Moscow)
zago.enrico@gmail.com
15:54:29 ...the project that im in, we are redefining the concept of property in rentals, creating a platform that allows liquid ownerships for the users
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:11:42 We went to the Arctic (city of Murmansk) in order to take some footage that could be usefull for the further develpment of the project, but at the time we were at the early stages of the process. We went to visit the tundra, the port and an nuclear icebreaker, and we took some shots with a Lidarscan under the supervision of Liam Young 
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:20:01 at the moment we are gathering a lot fo precedents in matter of cooperations and blockchain, we trying to frictioning our speculative narratives against the reality of the city
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:02:20 I deal with 3D matrix related stuff from a 5D perspective
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:09:26 so, 3d matrix is usual common dominant reality
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:15:44 its based on duality (good an evil, male female, cause and effect). This core principle of duality is why the checkered floor is such a crucial symbol in freemasonry
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:23:18 apparently duality echoes to many planes of existence, in the sense that there are entities dedicated to service to self as high as the 6th or 7th dimension I read
15:24:18 however it is possible to assume a higher view of point and get the bigger picture and the purpose of phenomena commonly known as Illuminati etc
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:27:45
Claire Tolan
19:32:56 I'm developing a game at present that dips into a lot of areas: Julian Jaynes' theory of the evolution of human consciousness and competing theories, theories of viral evolution and "mind viruses"/memes, rare earth mineral mining, the history of money, the history of  statistics and its contemporary veneration, theories and practices of hospitality, Lucretius and Epicurean philosophy, prayer and the evolution of contemporary religion, AND fantasy table tope role-playing games, among other things... 
19:32:59 phew!
19:33:16 *fantasy table-top role-playing games ha
Claire Tolan
17:27:45
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:03:11 I was a bit in a moral dilemma because sometimes I call the work I do disinfotainment
15:04:10 so asked Pamela Aaralyn, she is a professional psychic, she expained that to me with 5D etc. Totally made sense
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:27:45
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
14:58:45 this is a drawing with marker pens
14:58:52 the series is called
14:58:58 CHROMA KEYING
14:59:02 its new
14:59:26 simply put colorful barcodes
14:59:45 but actually they show different level frequencies
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:01:32 all the specturm as high as 5D
Claire Tolan
20:15:07 it's interesting to me to produce a multi-purpose product -- something that can be encountered as music (via the soundtrack), as literature (via the game manuals), as a social event (if you play it with your firends), or as a performance
Claire Tolan
10:27:45
Claire Tolan
20:16:36 I like the idea of playing the game as performance, because it will extend my interactions with the game beyond its production -- give it a kind of afterlife for my creative process. I really love watching Magic the Gathering tournaments, and so I started to think about the game as a kind of spectator sport. 
Claire Tolan
10:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:27:45
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:28:35 in the artic we visit also the city of teriberka in which we discovered an abandoned elementary school
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:31:24 it was really shoking to see how every thing was left behind, books, geographical maps, films, a piano...
zago.enrico@gmail.com
16:33:42 few days later we aknowledge that yes the school was abanoned but a year before a group of artist were staging all the scenography for a festival... i was amazing by the oddity of the story within the story...
Peter Moosgaard
17:27:45
Peter Moosgaard
16:55:15 it was on a tiny secluded island in the philippines. you could only walk for a total of 1 hour bc then the island was over. there was a jungle in the middle of the island, also a lot of beach. the first ideas were that the bauhaus aestetics could be easily be rebuilt with simple materials due to the simplicity of the designs. also the bauhaus is a bit of a myth, a cult, so i wanted to depict modernity as if it was an exotic ritual. to examine modernity in an almost ethnographic way ..
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:01:32 dealing with the grey zone between fact and fiction offers insights into alternative ways of thinking
15:02:20 on the internet something emerged that i like to describe as Trash Mysticism
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
17:27:45
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:01:32 the search for the whole truth is comparable to detective work. It happens that the investigative ambition flips and reveals obsessive fantasies
Claire Tolan
20:16:54 Because the soundtrack and certain themes draw out of ASMR, one rule of game play for performance is whispering. 
20:17:52 This makes a conspiratorial atmosphere, which I think is interesting to present as a performance. With the soundtrack, and possible additional audio components, it becomes even more performative. There are a lot of options to be explored here ☺ 
20:19:15 I should also say that the game play-as-performance, in theory, is me performing as a game master with different players on every location -- so it also becomes an instance of intensive game play between strangers. This would be interesting to do even without an audience. 
Claire Tolan
17:27:45
Claire Tolan
21:04:38 For this project, although I act as the game master, the players have a large amount of agency, and thus any plans that I have for the game mutate in every situation. Playing the game essentially becomes open-ended improv, which starts always from my seed but, from there, grows into its own form. This is what I like about the different ways that the game is experienced. When you read the manuals, you will understand how I intend it to be played and gain a static view of the world. But in play, it will be different every time; characters will lead many different lives and build many different worlds ☺ 
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
23:03:45
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
23:05:25
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:08:44 it is a network tracing the semantic interrelashionships between a cluster of icons related to the web
16:09:35 webnet
16:10:33  german word is quite illustrative zusammenhänge
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:16:44 i build this kind of intuitive
Claire Tolan
20:38:40 I think this is a deep and challenging experience whether players know each other or not, and that's what I'm interested in creating. 
Claire Tolan
21:07:25
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
21:05:25
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
21:05:25
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:28:48 i was inspired by the charts human design uses
16:29:30  HD its a new type of astrology
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:40:23 I started to work on this for palais des beaux arts but than didnt use it because Bernhard and I agreed to put emphasis on the zoom in function of map applications
15:40:56 a scalable vector map
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
15:45:25
Claire Tolan
20:38:40 In my earlier work with ASMR and performance, I was asking questions -- like what would happen if I directly transferred tropes from ASMR videos into a "live" environment. Although the game is also drawing out of ASMR, it's not really about this supplanting of online ~lingo~. It's mainly considering my role as game master vis a vis hospitality in ASMR, and playing off the role-playing tropes of the videos. But importantly, the game is made to be played around a table and not online because I am mostly interested in prolonged role-playing between people in situ. 
Peter Moosgaard
17:14:46 i had a translator but it still wasnt easy. the pictures and studies from the bauhaus era were often a point for conversation. some of the carpenters found the designs interesteresting, others were not so interested. but i wanted to see how these designs were interpreted on a philippine island, what could be done with the materials there and how the designs were adapted under these circumstances. we would sometimes communicate via the designs of the chairs, point at certain aspects and articulate with gestures.
Peter Moosgaard
17:27:00
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:07:25 i guess first I was intrigued by the similarity of the firefox logo and ouroboros symbol
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:27:03
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:29:13
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:17:18 for some reason the epicenter of it all became the Information and Awareness Office by Darpa
16:17:21 hehe
16:20:04 The seal of the Information Awareness Office (IAO) depicts the
all-seeing eye monitoring the globe. The IAO was established by
DARPA an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense, which played
 a vital role in the creation the basis for the future internet.
Peter Moosgaard
16:42:01 time is not linear in a networked culture. this is a stick i found in the woods near marseille, it had the exact shape of a usb logo. also a rock i found nearby had a perfect hole to stick the stick in. so both finds kind of illustrate the new in the old and vice versa.
Peter Moosgaard
16:40:13
Peter Moosgaard
17:09:38 the quality of strolling in the real world is that you see that things take time when they are physical, that superpossibility (which is coming with AR) is an illusion, it only concerns virtual things. but the best place to have a coffee is still reality.  
Fabian Faltin
12:22:20 Gardening has really taught me that humans have this special gift of tricking nature.
12:23:34 We do all sorts of crafty, and indeed artful things, just to get the fruit, the flowers, the vegetables and the meat. We could just go out and look for it, but we don't. Instead we build traps to capture nature's produce.
Fabian Faltin
12:27:01
Fabian Faltin
12:13:39 Well, there you can clearly see that nature has been tricked!
12:13:58 It is showing it's most monstrous and fertile side, which you wouldn't normally see.
Peter Moosgaard
17:28:12 the people didnt react to the bauhaus stuff as if it was exotic .. it was more that the modernist designers stole a lot from traditional techniques, certain abstractions for example, or the simplicity of huts and tools. so my experiment was more to see how it translates back to a more natural enviroment, out of the urban functionality so to say. and it was true in some cases
17:31:09 : the simplicity of modern industrial designs could often be translated into traditional worsk or organic working materials. like for example bent steel in marcel breuer chairs could be done with bamboo slowly bent over fire, or gerrit ritveld designs could be re-built with leftover mango wood
Peter Moosgaard
17:27:45
Fabian Faltin
17:31:12
Fabian Faltin
11:56:11 tricking nature is the whole beauty of gardening.
11:56:43 There are so many examples.
Fabian Faltin
12:20:06 You can find thousands of diagrams like this - an explanation of how to cut a tree (i.e. manipulate its natural growth habit) so that it produces more and better fruit.
12:21:32 This involves many aspects, and it can get really "tricky", but on a simple level, you can see for example that tree A is quite dense, and tree B has been opened up, to that sunlight can get to the fruit; which gives it a higher sugar content and better colour
Fabian Faltin
12:03:44 Now, you might say, all of this is also science, control, and has nothing to do with tricking nature.
12:04:04 it comes down to a question of attitude.
12:05:05 But for me, these examples have a lot to do with tricking, maybe because they are based on experience, because they need patience to work, and because everyone who has heard of these "tricks" can try them to.
Peter Moosgaard
17:28:12 my relation the the bauhaus is that i always admired the original ideas of brigning arts and crafts together, to use art and bring it to the people, to change how people live, to embrace technological possiblities and make the designs accecible and affordable
Fabian Faltin
12:46:35 we need to figure out how to arrange things so that the plants meet your expectations. This will take a lot of patience, observation, and maybe also some serious internet surfing.
Fabian Faltin
12:51:41 And at the end of the process, which could take some years, when you achieve some sort of mental, aesthetic and biological equilibrium between yourself and the plants, you can then rightfully call yourself a gardener or an artist.
frantiseck@gmail.com
19:50:11 Describe or illustrate your working environment / workspace 
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
20:27:45
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
16:45:04 I mess up one room than I move to the other
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
20:28:23
Claire Tolan
19:40:11 I'm lucky to have two rooms to myself right now, and so my studio is my living room, instead of my bedroom, which it has been in the past. My friends say that it looks more like a co-working space than a studio or a living room -- it's just a couch and tables. One of the tables hosts my speakers and computer. Pretty simple. 
Claire Tolan
19:50:45
Rosemary Lee
19:40:39 Often I repurpose my own domestic space, since now my studio is in the extra bedroom of my apartment. But my work seems to always overflow my attempts at being "in the studio", because now that I have the home studio, I prefer to work at the kitchen table instead.
Rosemary Lee
19:16:59 I've figured out I'm not much of a studio artist and have more of a mental studio I take with me and work in, whether I'm physically "in the studio" or riding the bus,  etc. I spend a lot of time thinking and writing, constructing things in my head before I make anything, so I guess those would be the activities which best encapsulate my artistic practice.
Rosemary Lee
19:20:45
Claire Tolan
19:22:17 My process doesn't move super intentionally. I read a lot, across topics, and across different types of media, and ideas tend to constellate out of these diverse inputs. I am also, recently at least, working along certain themes, and relevant ideas from my reading are kind of magnetically attracted, and then mutate the themes. 
19:23:28 sorry -- this should read: Relevant ideas from my reading are kind of magnetically attracted *to*, and then mutate the themes
Rosemary Lee
19:33:54 For me the distinction of being "in the studio" and not in the studio is a conceptual one much more than one of the setting. Each time I've tried to have a real artist studio it has failed disastrously, because I found I never wanted to be in a space strictly for making art.
19:35:40 I find I work better repurposing other spaces for art-working, so it becomes more fluid.
Peter Moosgaard
17:47:38 i had a studio under a mango tree, i used it to paint and do some other stuff. it was different because it was very hot and humid so i would be exhaused very quicky, also insects and other animals came to visit me!
Peter Moosgaard
17:50:45
Rosemary Lee
17:54:40
Rosemary Lee
19:42:44 I recently did a residency on a farm and my primary artistic activity while there involved carrying water from a stream up a mountain to sustain a group of plants. That was an interesting turn for me because I tend to be more object-oriented than that, and the artistic process became more performative and meditative.
19:44:13 It made me start reflecting on the layering of art and the world, where art invades ordinary things or subverts normality.
Rosemary Lee
19:54:40
Claire Tolan
19:14:04 walking often feels like the most productive "work" I do as an artist. When I'm procrastinating with code, I also find myself compulsively researching for my own projects. So, I guess these things -- walking, compulsive research in the gaps between obligatory coding -- are good illustrations. 
Rosemary Lee
19:20:11 I always liked the idea of Nietzsche walking and reading and writing, and although I've never been able to quite pull that off, walking also plays a role in my work. Movement unrelated to the task at hand somehow helps things to develop.
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
19:25:45
Fabian Faltin
11:18:45 It can be quite literally just sitting and staring. It can be a transcendtal calm, full of confidence. Or it can be a state of anguish and even depression, feeling overwhelmed by the demands of art. But with experience, you can navigate, or even induce these states in a creative way. For example, I find it quite interesting that when "nothing is happening", and then out of an impulse you pick up the phone and arrange a meeting with someone in two or three weeks time, that time is suddenly taut, infused with expectation and potential, although nothing specific is happening. But the meeting that will take place opens a space for art to happen.
11:21:30 it has a lot to do with cultivating a certain attitude.
11:22:15 Something like "keeping cool", though not in a fashion sense.
TR4SH M4GIC TV / Karin Ferrari
11:25:45
Rosemary Lee
19:27:15 the immaterial labour of art has been something which has captivated me for some time.
Rosemary Lee
19:30:38 I've been quite preoccupied with the relationship between material and immaterial manifestations of art and how beautiful concepts push into the material world.
Joe Hamilton
11:50:03 Most of my work starts with the computer but many of the works end as physical objects. I work with physical materials as well as digital so I need a studio.
Joe Hamilton
11:55:45
Joe Hamilton
10:04:17 I think the most regular activity is collecting digital material for my various archives.
10:05:28 I collect images and text fragments mainly. Some collections are presented on blogs while others are simply stored on my hard drive.
Joe Hamilton
10:13:14 I use the found images in my collections as source material for artworks or to illustrate certain ideas or aesthetics I'm exploring.
Peter Moosgaard
16:31:16 i go for long walks in the woods and around town, and also i surf around the internet. i collect things ..
16:32:25 i make screenshots and collect wood
Fabian Faltin
11:08:54 On a practical level, very routine activities, like shopping, internet surfing, gardening, practising drums or sports, or filling notebooks.
11:10:17 On a more spiritual level, I guess something like cultivating a certain 'inspired passivity'. You could compare it fishing - throwing your nets out and then waiting, waiting, waiting. Rather than actively chasing ideas or projects.
11:10:48 So actually a form of non-activity.
zago.enrico@gmail.com
17:00:53 i work a lot at home, i like to take my time and dont have to many distractions around me. My desk is a chaotic happening of printed sketches, food, coffee cups and cigarettes.That's the phisical environment around me usually. The digital one is more clean and organized, but yes i perceive much more immersive the virtual realm than the room. The music is a constant... different playlists for different processes. 
17:02:59 i really like to walk and get lost in th city when i feel stuck with my projects, it helps to relax and it brings back more clarity and focus
17:04:00 but i always come back to my home (the laptop)
17:05:01 sorry i dont have any picture of that....